The evolution of Microsoft’s solution for Application Lifecycle Management: Team Foundation Server – Part VII

Part I: Introduction

Part II: Diving into the basics of ALM and how did Microsoft start with an ALM solution?

Part III: Heterogeneous Software Development

Part IV: A fully integrated testing experience with TFS 2010

Part V: TFS 2012 and Continuous Value Delivery

Part VI: TFS 2013 and Visual Studio Online

Part VII: Conclusion

I have been a “Team System” user/advocate from the early beta versions in 2004 and it’s amazing to experience at short range what has been delivered with all releases of Team Foundation Server to improve the quality and predictability of software development. While the first release wasn’t all that glamorous to get up-and-running, it has definitely started a complete new way of collaborating as a team in software development projects.

Nevertheless IT software development projects still have a very bad reputation to deliver quality software on time and on budget. Often this is due to a lack of experience and a lack of software craftsmanship, but on many projects it’s also due to lack of a decent ALM vision and strategy. In a world where software is eating the world, all companies are becoming a software company and should invest in adopting Application Lifecycle Management. It’s not about writing some code that runs on one specific box, but it’s about bringing value to the market for the consumers of your product in a reliable and sustainable way. That’s why I like so much the cloud story for TFS and the increased delivery speed of new features. Have a closer look at the details in the Features Timeline page on Visual Studio Online to discover what has been released in the latest months.

The last few years have been extremely interesting for those people living in the ALM space. The evolution of ALM tools in the market has been phenomenal. From very specific niche tools of small companies to the more all-in-one solutions of the traditional big players like HP, IBM and Microsoft. The specific niche tools are more widespread in the startup landscape and might often be the best fit for one specific purpose. The big vendors on the other hand will always have their place in large organizations, but the challenge will remain to integrate all active ALM related tools to improve the collaboration and efficiency between different stakeholders. Many people are still keen to have quick access to the data they need within their tool of choice (whatever tool is perceived as the master ALM tool). Data will need to synchronize flawlessly across different ALM tools/solutions without losing focus on the value of a corporate ALM strategy. Companies like TaskTop and OpsHub are already playing an important role in this area.

ALMYourWay

Another important evolution of Microsoft’s ALM solution has been to also support non-Windows environments. Team Explorer Everywhere (TEE) was the result of specific attention for cross-platform collaboration from a dedicated group inside Microsoft (after buying Teamprise). Nowadays, all different TFS product teams inside Microsoft share a common vision to deliver ALM features for hybrid environments with extensibility in mind.

With the recent announcements of Application Insights and Monaco, Microsoft demonstrates to drive the industry further in an improved and fast Build-Measure-Learn cycle (Lean ALM) with an increased focus to embrace the opportunities of cloud computing.

I would like to finish off with a link to the recent publication of the new Gartner report (November 19, 2013) on Application Development Lifecycle Management where Microsoft has been identified again as leader in the Magic Quadrant.

Microsoft is a Leader in the ADLM market with a strong customer base and partner base, together with a solid stream of innovation. Microsoft offers one of the broadest sets of ADLM functionality available in the market; second only to IBM. Since delivering the Azure-based version of Microsoft TFS, the vendor has moved to a consistent release train, moving new features first to the cloud-based versions and then into on-premises releases.

8 Responses to The evolution of Microsoft’s solution for Application Lifecycle Management: Team Foundation Server – Part VII

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