The evolution of Microsoft’s solution for Application Lifecycle Management: Team Foundation Server – Part III

Part I: Introduction

Part II: Diving into the basics of ALM and how did Microsoft start with an ALM solution?

Part III: Heterogeneous Software Development

What about cross-platform development in the early versions of Microsoft Visual Studio Team System? Microsoft did not have a solution for this. Teamprise – founded in 2006 as a division of SourceGear – developed a suite of client applications for accessing Microsoft Visual Studio Team Foundation Server from outside the Visual Studio client environment. Teamprise enabled developers to use the source control and work item tracking features of Team Foundation Server from other platforms (operating systems that support a Java Runtime Environment), including Linux, Solaris and Mac OS, and from within the Eclipse IDE through a plug-in.

TeamPrise

This plug-in was also compatible with IBM’s Websphere Studio and Rational Application Developer IDE. There was also a stand-alone Teamprise client application (written in Java) which featured an Explorer-style user interface for developers not working within an IDE. The product was written by accessing the Team Foundation Server SOAP web services. A bit later in 2007 the company also started working on a Java SDK for use with Team Foundation Server. Big enterprises and third-party software vendors were interested in using libraries developed by Teamprise in order to link existing Java products with Team Foundation Server data. This addition was opening up a large set of core libraries to expose functionality to Java developers in the form of an API they can use to build their own TFS-enabled applications.

TFS 2008

Back in November 2007, Microsoft released a new version of the Team System product: Visual Studio Team System 2008. This release can be seen as the first update to the Team System brand. Visual Studio 2008 Team Foundation Server delivered improvements in several areas, such as enhanced features in Team Build and version control, better performance, scalability and more flexible configuration. But it was only in November 2009 that Microsoft acquired Teamprise to provide cross-platform support for Visual Studio. It was announced that functionality from the Teamprise Client suite would be integrated into the Visual Studio product line, beginning with the next version of Visual Studio (Visual Studio 2010). TFS in combination with the Teamprise Client Suite technologies would enable development teams to use a single tool to overcome core development challenges, regardless of the core platform in use. This decision by Microsoft was a commitment to provide ALM tooling support across the entire enterprise, a desire to avoid the artificial technological boundaries inside big companies. Heterogeneous development was at that time officially a new focus for the TFS/ALM product team inside Microsoft and the old TeamPrise (Java) developers joined the team. A few months later in April of 2012, Microsoft came up with a (temporary) name for the product: Microsoft Team Explorer 2010 codename “Eaglestone”, or TEE in short. The Program Manager for the new addition to the Visual Studio product suite was Martin Woodward, a senior software engineer from the former TeamPrise employees.

TFS 2010

At the global Visual Studio 2010 launch event in Las Vegas (April 2010) Visual Studio Team Explorer Everywhere (TEE) was announced. The Teamprise features were now completely integrated and part of the Microsoft solution set for development teams.

TEEBox

Announcement details:

Previously sold as a separate product, Visual Studio Team Explorer Everywhere 2010 works with your favorite Eclipse-based IDE, in the operating system of your choice, and helps you collaborate across your .NET and Java development teams using Team Foundation Server 2010. It’s an easy-to-install standalone plug-in that’s now a free download.

TEEScreenshot

Java developers of course also need to run builds and are adopting continuous building/integration practices. So, why not provide this via TFS Builds?

The Team Foundation Build Extensions (to be installed on the Team Foundation Build Agent) offered the ability to execute Ant or Maven 2 builds from Team Foundation Server and publish the results of the build along with any associated JUnit test results back to Team Foundation Server. This release was compatible with Team Foundation Server 2005, Team Foundation Server 2008 and Team Foundation Server 2010.

Team Explorer Everywhere and the Build Extensions got also updated in the newer versions of TFS to improve the Team Explorer experience in the non Visual Studio world.

I would also like to add a link here to a previous blogpost I made in March 2012, where I write more in detail about the benefits Team Foundation Server may offer in a heterogeneous software development environment: TFS as a true cross-technology ALM platform.

Next Part (Part IV) will tackle the integration of new Testing tools into the ALM solution with the release of Team Foundation Server 2010.

Part IV: A fully integrated testing experience with TFS 2010

Part V: TFS 2012 and Continuous Value Delivery

Part VI: TFS 2013 and Visual Studio Online

Part VII: Conclusion

 

7 Responses to The evolution of Microsoft’s solution for Application Lifecycle Management: Team Foundation Server – Part III

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: