Techorama Belgium – ALM and more!

March 30, 2014

For those who lived under a rock the last couple of months, you might not know yet, but there’s a new big international developer conference in Belgium which will take place on May 27 and May 28: Techorama.

Techorama-logo

Together with Gill and Kevin, I decided to roll up my sleeves! Read the full context why we are doing this.

Only 57 days left, so time to have a look at the ALM Track. I’m extremely happy with the speakers who will show up on stage.

May 27, 2014 (Day 1):

May 28, 2014 (Day 2):

You have to agree, this is a great line up and next to the ALM track, there are many other interesting sessions to follow that fit into one of the other tracks: Cloud, Mobile, Web, Languages & Tools and SQL/SharePoint for Devs. Have a look at the full agenda.

So, what’s your reason not to be present at Techorama? What’s missing to get you there? Let us know because over the years we want to make this the best dev conference in Belgium and around!

That’s why we are also promoting Techorama in other countries. Last month we did a Techorama on Tour event in London where Gill and I delivered two technical sessions on Windows 8.1 and Visual Studio Release Management. Other on Tour events are planned but not confirmed yet …

On top of the breakout sessions, Techorama will deliver two inspiring keynotes and during the conference you will have the opportunity to meet your peers and visit our partners.

See you at the first edition of Techorama in Mechelen! All feedback is welcome!


Visual Studio Release Management

January 23, 2014

Today I delivered a session at the VISUG event on Visual Studio Release Management.

I was pretty amazed with the number of people who showed up from the beginning. Usually we have quite a high no-show rate for our User Group sessions, but this time I guess that everybody was present! Thanks for all the people who joined one of our sessions today! The interest in a decent Release Management strategy/solution is increasing quite fast these days.

For a few of my customers, I’m also involved in some POCs to demonstrate the power of the Release Management features in the Visual Studio offering and the feedback is very promising.

My slides of today can be downloaded here and more general info can be found at the Microsoft product page.

Last important remark: using the latest Visual Studio Release Management features (part of the VS 2013 release) doesn’t require you to have TFS 2013. You can point the Release Management Server also to TFS 2010 and TFS 2012.

If you might be interested in an on-site session on this topic for your user group / company, please contact me via this contact form


The evolution of ALM/TFS – pdf available for download

December 3, 2013

A few weeks ago, I started with publishing different parts of an article on the evolution of Application Lifecycle Management.

Part I: Introduction

Part II: Diving into the basics of ALM and how did Microsoft start with an ALM solution?

Part III: Heterogeneous Software Development

Part IV: A fully integrated testing experience with TFS 2010

Part V: TFS 2012 and Continuous Value Delivery

Part VI: TFS 2013 and Visual Studio Online

Part VII: Conclusion

You can now also download the full article in pdf-format (25 pages in total – 2MB).

Happy reading!


The evolution of Microsoft’s solution for Application Lifecycle Management: Team Foundation Server – Part VII

November 27, 2013

Part I: Introduction

Part II: Diving into the basics of ALM and how did Microsoft start with an ALM solution?

Part III: Heterogeneous Software Development

Part IV: A fully integrated testing experience with TFS 2010

Part V: TFS 2012 and Continuous Value Delivery

Part VI: TFS 2013 and Visual Studio Online

Part VII: Conclusion

I have been a “Team System” user/advocate from the early beta versions in 2004 and it’s amazing to experience at short range what has been delivered with all releases of Team Foundation Server to improve the quality and predictability of software development. While the first release wasn’t all that glamorous to get up-and-running, it has definitely started a complete new way of collaborating as a team in software development projects.

Nevertheless IT software development projects still have a very bad reputation to deliver quality software on time and on budget. Often this is due to a lack of experience and a lack of software craftsmanship, but on many projects it’s also due to lack of a decent ALM vision and strategy. In a world where software is eating the world, all companies are becoming a software company and should invest in adopting Application Lifecycle Management. It’s not about writing some code that runs on one specific box, but it’s about bringing value to the market for the consumers of your product in a reliable and sustainable way. That’s why I like so much the cloud story for TFS and the increased delivery speed of new features. Have a closer look at the details in the Features Timeline page on Visual Studio Online to discover what has been released in the latest months.

The last few years have been extremely interesting for those people living in the ALM space. The evolution of ALM tools in the market has been phenomenal. From very specific niche tools of small companies to the more all-in-one solutions of the traditional big players like HP, IBM and Microsoft. The specific niche tools are more widespread in the startup landscape and might often be the best fit for one specific purpose. The big vendors on the other hand will always have their place in large organizations, but the challenge will remain to integrate all active ALM related tools to improve the collaboration and efficiency between different stakeholders. Many people are still keen to have quick access to the data they need within their tool of choice (whatever tool is perceived as the master ALM tool). Data will need to synchronize flawlessly across different ALM tools/solutions without losing focus on the value of a corporate ALM strategy. Companies like TaskTop and OpsHub are already playing an important role in this area.

ALMYourWay

Another important evolution of Microsoft’s ALM solution has been to also support non-Windows environments. Team Explorer Everywhere (TEE) was the result of specific attention for cross-platform collaboration from a dedicated group inside Microsoft (after buying Teamprise). Nowadays, all different TFS product teams inside Microsoft share a common vision to deliver ALM features for hybrid environments with extensibility in mind.

With the recent announcements of Application Insights and Monaco, Microsoft demonstrates to drive the industry further in an improved and fast Build-Measure-Learn cycle (Lean ALM) with an increased focus to embrace the opportunities of cloud computing.

I would like to finish off with a link to the recent publication of the new Gartner report (November 19, 2013) on Application Development Lifecycle Management where Microsoft has been identified again as leader in the Magic Quadrant.

Microsoft is a Leader in the ADLM market with a strong customer base and partner base, together with a solid stream of innovation. Microsoft offers one of the broadest sets of ADLM functionality available in the market; second only to IBM. Since delivering the Azure-based version of Microsoft TFS, the vendor has moved to a consistent release train, moving new features first to the cloud-based versions and then into on-premises releases.


The evolution of Microsoft’s solution for Application Lifecycle Management: Team Foundation Server – Part VI

November 25, 2013

Part I: Introduction

Part II: Diving into the basics of ALM and how did Microsoft start with an ALM solution?

Part III: Heterogeneous Software Development

Part IV: A fully integrated testing experience with TFS 2010

Part V: TFS 2012 and Continuous Value Delivery

Part VI: TFS 2013 and Visual Studio Online

The latest release of Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server (Visual Studio 2013) will empower development teams to live up to the demand of a new breed of applications, to develop and manage modern software that provides the best experience across multiple screens and devices, always-connected services. The wave of extra ALM features will help to become more productive and eases the collaboration between team members with improved support for agile development practices: Agile Portfolio Management, Team Rooms, Test Management from the browser, Work Item Charting, on-premises support for Git repositories, Code Health Indicators (CodeLens), Cloud Load Testing via Team Foundation Service, the connected IDE experience across all your Visual Studio instances …

AgilePortfolioManagement

WorkitemCharting

An important trend which continued to be reflected in the 2013 release is the improved integration towards other Microsoft products (for example System Center and Windows Azure). In that respect we will probably also see some upcoming modifications in the integration with InRelease, a release management solution from InCycle. Microsoft reached an agreement to acquire InRelease on June 3, 2013. The solution allowed software development teams to automatically deploy and track applications (from Team Foundation Server) as a whole to multiple environments – up to production – based on a business-approval workflow.

InRelease

While the official release of Visual Studio 2013 was planned on November 13 with the Launch Event, the RTM bits were already made available on October 17, 2013.

Before the official release, the public could experience already the more tight integration with Windows Azure. For example:

Visual Studio Online

But, important new announcements were made at the official Launch Event. Team Foundation Service became Visual Studio Online in the perspective of broadening the complete offering to indicate that Visual Studio Online will become the services component of the developer tools for the future.

VisualStudioOnline

Visual Studio Online, formerly Team Foundation Service, is the home for your project data in the cloud. Get up and running in minutes on our cloud infrastructure without having to install or configure a single server. Set up an environment that includes everything from hosted Git repos and project tracking tools, to continuous integration and an IDE, all packaged up in a monthly per-user plan. Connect to your project in the cloud using your favorite development tool, such as Visual Studio, Eclipse or Xcode.

Visual Studio Online is now running in Commercial Preview mode (paid usage is enabled and price plans have been announced) and will shift to General Availability somewhere in 2014, after all billing services have been put into place. Until that time, everyone may still freely use the system as an early adopter. Cloud Build and Cloud Load Testing as described above are already part of the released features of the service, while 2 new preview features have also been announced at the Visual Studio 2013 Launch event: Application Insights and Monaco.

Application Insights, Build-Measure-Learn

This Visual Studio Online feature now provides a 360 degree view of running applications by collecting, processing and displaying a wide variety of telemetry in three areas: performance, usage and availability.

ApplicationInsights

Without any effort during the development lifecycle (seamless integration experience), development teams will benefit from the extensive set of collected diagnostics to analyze what’s going on in their deployed applications. With these valuable insights, future (to-be-developed) improvements can be more focused and impactful. Application Insights will be able to deliver the required metrics to adopt validated learning and to move into a real Build-Measure-Learn cycle.

Monaco, Visual Studio in the browser

In an attempt to bring the client development experience in Visual Studio to the cloud, Microsoft released a preview of Monaco which immediately enables the development of Windows Azure Websites directly from any modern browser on any device. It complements the Visual Studio desktop IDE as a low-friction entry point that will help any developer to get started or make quick changes to an existing cloud service. It has support for C#, VB.NET, HTML5, JavaScript applications and PHP.

Monaco

Time to wrap-up this article on the evolution of ALM/TFS in the final Part VII.

Part VII: Conclusion

 


The evolution of Microsoft’s solution for Application Lifecycle Management: Team Foundation Server – Part V

November 18, 2013

Part I: Introduction

Part II: Diving into the basics of ALM and how did Microsoft start with an ALM solution?

Part III: Heterogeneous Software Development

Part IV: A fully integrated testing experience with TFS 2010

Part V: About TFS 2012, the Cloud, Git and the new shipping cadence

The next major release of Team Foundation Server (TFS 2012) was released on September 12, 2012. Some of the key new features in this release were full integration of Agile Project Management through a new improved Web Access UI, involvement of feedback from other stakeholders in the software development process by using PowerPoint StoryBoarding and the Feedback Client, increasing the productivity of developers by introducing a new Team Explorer UI and by providing important version control enhancements like the availability of Local Workspaces.

AgileProjectManagement

Continuous Value Delivery

The main theme of this release was Continuous Value Delivery. TFS 2012 delivered workflows and tools that are able to shorten delivery cycles, include customers and operations (non-development stakeholders) in software construction, and it looks for opportunities to reduce waste in the software development process. As a result, your organization should be able to reduce risks, solve problems faster, and continuously deliver value that exceeds customers’ expectations.

DeliveryCycle

TFS2012Overview

Primary goals of ALM with Visual Studio 2012:

  • Prioritize collaboration among everyone involved in developing an application, incorporating customers as equal members of the development team.
  • Deliver timely and actionable feedback to reduce wasted effort and its associated costs.
  • Provide natural and appropriate tools for the tasks involved in designing, developing,  testing, delivering, and maintaining quality software.
  • Support best practices for application development, while remaining independent of any specific methodology.

Reflecting on the impact this release had for many of my customers, it must have been the best release of Team Foundation Server. The majority of the new big features were easy to demonstrate and it didn’t take long to convince decision makers of the business value to upgrade old TFS environments to TFS 2012 or to introduce it to new customers who were struggling with implementing ALM in general. There were so many known pain points in software development tracks which could benefit heavily from built-in solutions in the TFS 2012 release. Think about for instance the possibility to shorten the feedback loop between business and the development team, but it also included important development productivity features like explicit code reviews in the daily workflow of developers and the inclusion of a new improved diff/merge experience. After feeling a bit lost in the redesigned Team Explorer UI in the beginning, it became clear that it focused more on a task-oriented approach, freeing the development team from many of the distractions that can occur when working on a complex project and enabling the team to work more quickly and more efficient (for example: Suspend-And-Resume functionality to stay in the zone). Testing became a true first-class citizen in the development process with a unified Test Explorer in Visual Studio and a unique way to perform automated and exploratory testing from Microsoft Test Manager.

DevOps

Team Foundation Server 2012 provided also a server monitoring solution for teams that use or want to adopt System Center Operations Manager (SCOM). A monitoring agent can be installed/configured for ASP.NET applications running on a web server. This agent collects rich data about exceptions, performance issues, and other errors. Using the TFS Connector for SCOM, Operations staff can file these exceptions as operational issues (work items) in TFS and assign them to the development team to investigate in order to improve and fix production web applications. Visual Studio and the TFS connector, in conjunction with SCOM, provide a real-time improvement feedback loop for server-based applications deployed in production environments, leading to continuous improvements, an increased mean time to repair (MTTR) cycle and better quality in the end of the application in production.

TFS-SCOM

The Cloud Story

More importantly, Microsoft has also been working very hard on an ALM “cloud” offering in this timeframe: Team Foundation Service or Team Foundation Server in the cloud. A preview of Team Foundation Service was announced for the first time at the BUILD Conference in 2011 and the public launch was communicated on June 11 of 2012. What started as a technical experiment to get TFS running on Windows Azure eventually evolved into a new product which also completely shifted the release cadence for new Team Foundation Server releases. More info on this in one of the next paragraphs.

TheCloudStory

The cloud version of Team Foundation Server provides (small) development teams easy access to ALM features (Version Control, Agile Collaboration and Automated Builds) without having to install and manage the server application on-premises. Not all existing on- premises TFS features like Reporting and Lab Management are available in Team Foundation Service, but it’s clear that this offering is quite compelling for small companies that want to be instantly up-and-running with the foundations of Application Lifecycle Management.

The Git Story

Also in 2012, Microsoft announced (basic) Git integration with Team Foundation Server via the open source Git-TF solution (http://gittf.codeplex.com/) which offered a set of cross-platform command line tools (running on Windows, Mac and Linux) for sharing version control changes between TFS and Git. Instead of building their own Distributed Version Control System (DVCS), Microsoft decided to embrace Git (the most popular DVCS solution on the market) even more when it was publicly announced in January 2013 that Team Foundation Server would host genuine Git repositories and Visual Studio would get native Git support for managing local and hosted repositories. I remember Brian Harry introducing that idea in a private NDA event at the MVP Summit in February 2012 (almost a year before the public announcement). There were mixed opinions internally in the TFS product team, but for the Visual Studio ALM MVP group it sounded immediately as the way to go: adopt the best DVCS solution in the market! I’m still very glad Microsoft eventually took this decision because it’s nowadays actually adding extra value for DVCS workflows in Visual Studio on top of Git instead of playing catch up with Git by building their own “Microsoft” DVCS solution. Git didn’t have the best client development experience on the Windows platform in the past, but with the Visual Studio Tools for Git, developers are getting native support for managing Git repositories inside Visual Studio and they could also target hosted Git repositories in Team Foundation Service. Including Git in the broad ALM vision of Microsoft resulted today in an integrated enterprise-ready ALM offering with Git: version control, work item tracking and build automation. It’s good to see that Microsoft is now actively working together in the open-source space to provide the best possible experience for software developers and it strengthens Microsoft’s presence on non-Windows platforms.

TFS Shipping Cadence

As from the beginning, Team Foundation Server has been a boxed product which had a 2 to 3 year release cycle. Bringing TFS to the cloud started a new unknown era. Rolling out fixes/updates for an on-premises product or for a cloud service is totally different. Imagine a cloud service which doesn’t update for a long period of time. People would assume it’s dead and forgotten. Customers of TFS in the cloud expect the product to evolve much faster than a boxed product and a service in the cloud must always be “on”. Delivering small and big updates to Team Foundation Server (different on-premises versions + cloud) was a big challenge for the TFS Product Team, but they managed to get it aligned pretty well now. Team Foundation Service will always be the front-runner and is updated every three weeks with features enabled/disabled by feature flags. Many features you will detect in the cloud may not be present for quite some time in the version of TFS you are running on-premises. On average, updates to VS/TFS (on-premises software) are pushed in a quarterly update and new major versions of TFS will be released yearly.

TFSShippingCadence

Part VI will cover the latest release of Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server: VS and TFS 2013. Stay tuned!

Part VI: TFS 2013 and Visual Studio Online

Part VII: Conclusion

 


The evolution of Microsoft’s solution for Application Lifecycle Management: Team Foundation Server – Part IV

November 11, 2013

Part I: Introduction

Part II: Diving into the basics of ALM and how did Microsoft start with an ALM solution?

Part III: Heterogeneous Software Development

Part IV: A fully integrated testing experience with TFS 2010

The third release of Microsoft’s ALM Solution (Visual Studio 2010) no longer used the Team System moniker and brought all the available SKUs back under the good old Visual Studio brand. The 2010 release was definitely the most significant release with many new functionality and improvements since the launch of the product with Team System 2005. Microsoft put a lot of effort into building a full testing experience into Team Foundation Server with a test management suite for managing test planning and for running manual/automated UI tests, including the ability to analyze test impact based on code changes. The Lab Management solution on top of TFS was quite revolutionary and can now be seen as the first indications of the growing importance of automated deployment and testing.

ALMwithVS2010

As a result, Gartner included Microsoft as Visionary for the first time in their Magic Quadrant for Integrated Software Quality Suites (published report of January 2011).

Microsoft Test Manager (MTM) was the new kid on the block and could be purchased separately with the Test Professional Suite (with MSDN Subscription). The Ultimate edition of Visual Studio also contained Microsoft Test Manager. Many existing testing tools on the market focused particularly on helping specialists testers (strong programming/scripting skills) with white box testing and API testing, but the majority of testing activities in the industry was still done manually (black box testing) while not a lot of testing tools provided extra support for this manual work. Consider MTM as an integrated test environment (ITE) for testers, compared to an integrated development environment (IDE) for developers.

The new SKU wanted to provide a bridge between the testing team and the development team. It’s the interface that a tester will use to create test cases, organize test plans, track test results, and file bugs when defects are found. Test Manager is integrated with Team Foundation Server, and is designed to improve the productivity of testers.

ITE

An interesting feature was for example the ability to play back action recordings to fast forward to a particular test step in a manual test to verify if a bug was fixed. It was also possible to create automated UI tests in Visual Studio (known as Coded UI Tests) using new automation libraries. You could generate C#/VB.NET code in Visual Studio from an existing action recording and add validation code to verify that the application under test was performing correctly.

The most compelling story was to file actionable bugs as a tester to avoid the typical ping-pong game between developers and testers. Familiar with the famous “it works on my machine” reply from the developer who marked the bug as non-reproducible? During a manual/automated test run with the built-in Test Runner, a lot of Diagnostic Data Adapters (DDA) could be enabled (test settings) to automatically collect and attach all data to a new Bug report: video recording, system information, IntelliTrace, Test Impact Analysis, screenshots, … It became plain easy for a tester to gather all important information and send it to the development team for further validation. Next to this, test managers could follow up which builds had bug fixes and/or new features added. They were also presented with recommendations about which tests needed to be rerun, based on the effect of code changes that were made to the codebase (test impact analysis on managed code). Instead of rerunning all test cases over and over again, testers could stay up-to-date with a new iteration by designing new test cases.

testReport

The icing on the cake for me was Visual Studio Lab Management 2010, an add-on for TFS 2010 which extended the Build Automation feature. It allowed builds to easily deploy their output to virtual environments which could exist of multiple virtual machines. Relying on the snapshotting features of the virtualization technology (Hyper-V), complete environments could be rolled back to a known clean snapshot/checkpoint to always enforce a clean deployment for each new manual/scheduled build. Automated Tests could be integrated in the Build-Deploy cycle of the Lab Build to validate each new deployment. The ultimate goal was to detect bugs as soon as possible in every incremental update of your application in Development and once a defect was found, all collected data through the collectors could be easily stored in an actionable bug report. No more no repro!

Team Foundation Server 2010 was designed to be easily customizable and extensible. TFS ensures that developers using any development platform can participate. This was also identified by an independent ALM study of Gartner, published in a report in June 2012. Microsoft has been identified as a leader in this area with the TFS 2010 offering. This is a clear indication that Microsoft has great tools for Application Lifecycle Management. Many larger companies also needed to think about compliance (Sarbanes-Oxley Act). This is often a very important and crucial requirement when choosing an enterprise ALM tool. Team Foundation Server 2010 provided three main pieces of functionality as it relates to SOx – Work Item Tracking, Version Control and Automated Build. These three features working together provided the capability to eliminate many of the risks associated with SOx 404 compliance. At the heart of SOx is the ability to know who made what change when, what requirement was the change made for and who authorized the change to be made. Was the requirement tested to make sure that it works correctly and who authorized the release of that requirement to production? Or, to state it another way, is the requirement traceable? Many technical solutions require multiple tools to provide this kind of traceability and most of the time they break the traceability chain at some point because they are not integrated at all required points. With Team Foundation Server 2010, full traceability was baked in. Team Foundation Server provided a comprehensive and flexible set of capabilities through traceability, test case management and automated builds. The rich extensibility of both the built-in features and a third-party ecosystem produce tools your company need in order to meet the requirements of SOx. A full article on Sox and TFS 2010 is available at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg983694.aspx.

In the next part (Part V) I will continue with the release of TFS 2012 and the spring of the cloud story: running TFS on Windows Azure.

Part V: TFS 2012 and Continuous Value Delivery

Part VI: TFS 2013 and Visual Studio Online

Part VII: Conclusion

 


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